Newest For Sharing Reviews

From TheBookbag
Jump to: navigation, search
WOB.png

Lion Practice by Emma Carlisle

4.5star.jpg For Sharing

Laura loves practising at being different kinds of animals. As well as being a kangaroo and an elephant, she's an expert at being a crocodile (much to the other children's dismay in the swimming pool!) But one day she decides that it's time for lion practice, and this is the day when her parents think her imagination has gone just a little too far… Full review...

Molly Maybe's Monsters: The Dappity Doofer by Kristina Stephenson

4.5star.jpg For Sharing

Molly Maybe lives in Smallsbury, a snoringly, boringly, ordinary place - well, it is until you discover the town's best kept secret. But before we talk about that, let me tell you about Molly's treehouse, where she and her dog, Waggy Burns, can look out over her neighbours' gardens. Mr Bottomly Brown is doing some digging (it's going to be a pond) and he's discovered something rather peculiar: it looks like a small statue. Three days later the statue is in place in the middle of the pond but that's not what's making Mr Brown angry - there are piles of soil all over his perfect lawn. He's convinced that it's moles, but Molly has spotted a claw and she knows better. Full review...

Bear and Hare: Where's Bear? by Emily Gravett

5star.jpg For Sharing

Bear and Hare are playing hide and seek. Hare covers his eyes, turns to face the wall, counts slowly to ten and then goes looking for Bear. Unfortunately he's tried to hide behind and under the standard lamp and he's not exactly invisible. Well, let's be honest - he looks as though he's wearing a very strange hat. Still, we can always have another go, can't we? This time, after the ritual counting, Bear is behind a (very small) pile of books. OK, one more time? This time it's the fish tank. I'd like to be able to say that he was behind the tank, but he's visible over, under and through the tank. Even the fish look rather surprised. Full review...

More! by Tracey Corderoy and Tim Warnes

4star.jpg For Sharing

Archie the rhino has a new favourite word - more! Whatever it is that Archie likes, he likes it a lot! He just wants more of everything; more stories, more bubbles in the bath, more glitter...but what happens when one day, Archie's idea of 'more' becomes a little too much to handle? Full review...

Captain Pugwash by John Ryan

5star.jpg For Sharing

Captain Pugwash was first published in 1957. It was a comic strip, a TV animation and the story series developed into a further twenty four titles. Pugwash is conceited, stupid, podgy, unshaven and lovable. His crew are the laziest afloat, his enemy, Cut-Throat Jake, is satisfyingly villainous and cabin-boy Tom can always be relied on to save the day. Many families will remember these as childhood favourites whether in print or on the screen. Full review...

The Bear and the Piano by David Litchfield

5star.jpg For Sharing

One day a small bear cub finds something strange in the middle of the woods. Not knowing what it is he tentatively touches it with his paw. It makes an awful sound! However the little bear continues to visit the object over months and years and gradually the sounds become beautiful and the bear feels happy. The other bears love listening to the wonderful music that he makes and then one day a father and daughter visit the forest and tell the bear he should take his musical talent to the big city. So the bear embarks on a journey to seek his fame and fortune. Although the city is all the bear could possibly have hoped for, something deep inside him is tugging him back home. Full review...

Super Happy Magic Forest by Matty Long

4star.jpg For Sharing

The Lord of the Rings has an impressive legacy, both as a trilogy of books and films. Its impact on the fantasy genre as a whole is almost immeasurable – in many ways the genre exists because of these books. Frodo and co. also lives on within the people who love and cherish the books and the fantasy genre as a whole, but how do you spark this enthusiasm in your kids? Matty Long may just have come up with a cunning plan. Full review...

Mortimer and the Sword Excalibur by Joan Aiken and Quentin Blake

4.5star.jpg For Sharing

If you think about all the many unsuitable items that Mortimer the raven has eaten, from staircases to bowler hats, it's surprising that he's still in as good a shape as he is. This time, Mortimer finds himself left alone with Mrs Jones' sewing machine. I'm still not sure why Mrs Jones ever lets him out of her sight, since he has an unerring capacity for trouble, yet here we find him, gobbling down the pink material that is intended for Arabel's new dress, swiftly followed by the needle! When Mortimer eventually discovers the foot pedal that makes the sewing machine go he and Arabel are turfed out of the house and allowed to go across the road to the park where a crowd has gathered around an interesting find in a large hole… Full review...

The Spiral Stair by Joan Aiken and Quentin Blake

5star.jpg For Sharing

I'm rather fond of Arabel and Mortimer. I like the outlandish situations that they find themselves in, and the way Joan Aiken wrote the stories without speaking down to her readers in any way, inserting humour for the grown ups reading them too. Here our terrible twosome have been sent to Uncle Urk at the zoo whilst Mr Jones is in hospital. Aunt Effie, however, has little patience for a noisy raven. Will Mortimer land them both in trouble? Or will they somehow manage to save the zoo from a scurrilous animal-stealing plot? Full review...

The Little House by the Sea by Benedict Blathwayt

4star.jpg For Sharing

By the sea, on the Isle of Mull, there was a ruined cottage, but it wasn't entirely uninhabited. The roof had fallen in and the windows were empty but that didn't stop the mice finding snug and dry homes in the walls. Rabbits enjoyed the weeds in the garden and the doorway to the cottage was used as a shelter by the sheep when it rained. Sparrows nested under the roof and a stray cat slept in the pile of leaves in the fireplace. Then one day Finn came along. He was a fisherman and he began to repair the house. He worked too - catching fish and taking tourists to see the seals and Fingal's cave. But what about the birds and animals who had lived in the cottage before Finn came along? Full review...

Clever Polly and the Stupid Wolf by Catherine Storr

5star.jpg Emerging Readers

Polly opens the door one day to find a large black wolf standing on the doorstep. With no preamble whatsoever, not even a cursory hello, the wolf informs Polly that he intends to eat her up. Incredibly Polly invites the wolf into her home and even into the kitchen! What can she be thinking of? Well, young Polly is clever, resourceful, independent and charming. The wolf is a wolf of very little brain. Therefore it is not long before she is able to outwit the wolf and send him packing. This first story is very short but sets the scene for the ongoing battle of wits between Polly and the wolf that will continue for the remaining twelve short stories in this charming and entertaining book. Full review...

NO! by David McPhail

4star.jpg For Sharing

A boy - we never learn his name - leaves home with a letter to post. If we look carefully we get a hint about who the letter is going to, but getting to the post box is not going to be easy, because the boy lives in a war zone. There are planes dropping bombs, tanks taking out buildings, soldiers carrying bayonets kicking down doors and a policeman with truncheon aloft and vicious dog at his side. The boy walks through it all as though completely unmoved, but when he reaches the postbox there's a bully lounging there and the first thing that he does is to knock the boy's hat off. Our hero has had enough - and we know just what he says... Full review...

Melric and the Dragon by David McKee

5star.jpg For Sharing

There's a hoard of dragons loose in the kingdom! Crikey! Luckily the King has a whole army of soldiers with nothing else on their plate (except quite a few jam sandwiches) so he has plenty of troops to send on a search and destroy mission. Full review...

Kipper's Beach Ball by Mick Inkpen

4.5star.jpg For Sharing

It's play time at the beach for Kipper and Tiger in this magical book about living in the moment because it might be over before you know it. Full review...

Katie McGinty Wants a Pet by Jenna Harrington and Finn Simpson

5star.jpg For Sharing

Katie McGinty wants a pet. Really, really, REALLY wants a pet. Daddy says no, not yet, not until she's bigger. So she waits. And she waits. And then the time comes. Full review...

The Bolds by Julian Clary and David Roberts

5star.jpg Confident Readers

The Bolds, Mr and Mrs and their two small children, live in an ordinary semi-detached house in suburban Teddington. They have jobs; Mrs Bold designs and sells flamboyant hats and Mr Bold writes jokes for Christmas crackers. But they are most definitely not an ordinary family. Oh no! They are in fact hyenas. So far they have managed to successfully pretend to be human beings. Although very hairy and prone to laughing a lot they have kept the truth (and their tails!) a secret from everyone. But their grumpy next door neighbour, Mr McNumpty, is growing suspicious and then a trip to the local safari park has repercussions. Will the Bolds' carefully long kept secret be revealed? Full review...

Nina Goes Barking Mad! by Anita Pouroulis

4star.jpg For Sharing

Nina and George are Jules' dogs. George is badly behaved. He once dug up the entire front lawn. Mum said she wanted to give him away. It's Nina who is in the dog house though in this edition of the Jules, Nina and George series. She just won't stop barking. Mum, Jules and even George are being driven crazy. Inspired by a TV show, Jules sets out to think like a dog and pin down what on earth the matter can be. Full review...

Pirates Don't Drive Diggers by Alex English and Duncan Beedie

4star.jpg For Sharing

Ah, that age old dilemma or whether to go into the family business or whether to set out alone and follow your dreams! In this story we meet Brad, who has been born into a family of pirates but who dreams of life on a building site. His dad (friendly looking pirate though he is) has no time for Brad's nonsense, and packs him off to sea to learn what pirates do. Is this to be a tale of tragedy and woe? Don't worry, Brad may get to drive a digger after all… Full review...

Poo in the Zoo by Steve Smallman and Ada Grey

5star.jpg For Sharing

If you’re one of those parents who really can’t stand farting jokes, or avoids nappy changing discussions with your peers at all costs then step away from this review now! This is a story that is made for families who enjoy a funny poo story, and who can bear a few armpit fart noises now and then! For this is a book that is entirely about poo, from start to finish, so make sure everyone who needs to be is in a nice clean nappy, then get ready for a treat of a read! Full review...

Black Cat, White Cat by Silvia Borando

4star.jpg For Sharing

'Black Cat, White Cat' made me laugh out loud. In a lifetime of consuming literature greedily, I can count on one hand the number of books that have had this effect on me. I couldn't wait to read it with someone else to share the joke. Given that the humour relies on an element of surprise, I'm torn about how much to reveal here so, for the moment, I'll tell you a bit more about the book. Full review...

The Only Pupil in the School by Hsukung Liu and Xinlin Wang (translator)

4star.jpg For Sharing

On the first day of the school term only one pupil appeared and the teachers began to worry about losing their jobs. So they made their minds up that they would make their only pupil the best in the school, which - when you think about it - wasn't going to be all that difficult. They began by trying to persuade her to come to their classes and when that didn't persuade her they began fighting amongst themselves and didn't notice our heroine creeping away. She went to the forest and met an old man who taught her lots about the flowers and the insects. A chef showed her how to make soup - it was delicious and warming - and then she had lots of fun (and exercise) with a dog she met in the park. The further she looked, the more she learned and at the library she drew a book about what she had seen - and it was there that the teachers found her. Full review...

Rama and the Demon King by Jessica Souhami

4star.jpg For Sharing

Rama was a brave and good prince, the king's favourite son. He loved his wife, Sita and his best friend was his brother Lakshman. Everyone loved him, except for one person. His stepmother was jealous and she was determined to get rid of Rama. Long ago she had saved the king's life and he had promised to grant her any wish. She asked that he send Rama into the forest for fourteen years and although the king was horrified he had to keep his promise. Rama was sent into the forest, but he did not go alone, as Sita and Lakshman went with him and for a while all was well. They fought off the demons who first appeared and then built a house and led a simple life among the forest animals. Full review...

When I Am Happiest by Rose Lagercrantz and Eva Eriksson

5star.jpg Emerging Readers

If Dani leaves her school for the summer holidays with one souvenir, it will either be the memories of the fabulous friendship she formed with Ella, who struck a chord in book one then moved away, or it will be a book she has written and compiled to remind her of all the happiness she has encountered along the way. That is not quite finished, for the following day is to be the great end of year party, and her classroom decorations are complete and her dress has been bought new specially. But not all of life is happiness and jollity – and Dani is removed from the classroom to face very bad news. What ending is in store, for her book and for ours? Full review...

Dinoblock by Christopher Franceschelli

4star.jpg For Sharing

As befits a book about dinosaurs, 'Dinoblock' is suitably chunky. Not monstrously large but enticingly substantial in a 'pick me up and read me' kind of way. Inside this board book, twenty plus beasts are on parade. If you don't know your Triassic from your Jurassic step this way… Full review...

Grandad's Island by Benji Davies

4star.jpg For Sharing

Syd and his Grandad are going on an adventure – through the door in Grandad's attic to a ship that will sail across an ocean of rooftops to a magical tropical island. They are going to find new wonders at every turn as they explore the island and make lots of new friends in the form of the animals and birds. In fact, it's such an amazing place that Grandad decides to stay. Full review...

The Hounds of Falsterbo by Jules Nilsson

4star.jpg For Sharing

In between the beach huts
Where the white sands meet the seas,
The heather meets the sand dunes
And long grasses dance the breeze. Full review...

The Hippobottymus by Steve Smallman and Ada Grey

4.5star.jpg For Sharing

The Hippobotymus is a great romp through the jungle using language to create sound and rhythm which is really fun to engage with and read aloud. All the animals are having a great time, singing their song and each adding their own sounds, but just what is it that Hippo did? You’ll just have to read it to find out. Full review...

The First Slodge by Jeanne Willis and Jenni Desmond

5star.jpg For Sharing

The First Slodge thinks everything is his, until he finds out he might be the first Slodge, but that doesn’t make him the only Slodge. Will they learn to share? They might just have to. I found The First Slodge to be a fascinating book. I loved the ideas, and I think it’s great that a picture book is managing to tackle a number of issues all at once like this without losing its own sense of story and purpose. Full review...

Claude: Lights! Camera! Action! by Alex T Smith

4.5star.jpg For Sharing

Ah, Claude! How I do enjoy reading these funny little stories about this sweet doggy! This time Claude finds himself embroiled in shenanigans on a film set, helping with wigs and make up and a film star gorilla! Claude is as endearing as ever, and Mr Bobblysock continues to enchant us with his hot flushes and requirements for a little lie down. Full review...

Three Cheers for Thomas the Tank Engine by W Awdry

4star.jpg For Sharing

I don't like Thomas the Tank Engine. He may be a 'really useful' engine but he is also over exposed and (Surely? Please?) at commercial saturation point. Why then do I have a copy of 'Three Cheers for Thomas the Tank Engine' at my side? Well, for the same reason that a pack of Thomas, Percy and James socks, infant size 3-5, ended up in my shopping basket at the weekend. Yes, the owner of those titchy feet is my toddler boy and boy, does he love Thomas. Full review...

Wake Up, Alfred! by David Ellwand

4star.jpg For Sharing

It's Alfred's birthday! We don't know how old he is, because once dogs have reached full size they tend to look much the same for quite a few years. And talking of looks, Alfred does look rather splendid – he's a Great Dane in gorgeous condition. But – back to the book! We see – in a series of black and white photographs – Alfred being woken up (he wears a nightcap), looking outside his kennel to see what the postman has brought him, opening his presents, laying the table before his friends arrive (and being just a little bit naughty by balancing a tea cup and saucer on his head...), putting the bunting up for the party, making the cake, having a much-needed bath (after making a bit of a mess with the cake), choosing which hat he's going to wear and then having great fun with his friends – there are seven dogs, two mice and a cat. Full review...

It's a Groovy World, Alfredo! by Sean Taylor and Chris Garbutt

4star.jpg For Sharing

Cool boogie-style. Speedy Heebie-Jeebies. Silky-smooth moving and grooving. These are the three dances that Marty tries to teach his friend, Alfredo. But Alfredo can't dance. Every time he tries the same thing happens – he goes Jump, Jump, Jump and looks like a duck on a trampoline. Alfredo is worried that everyone will laugh at him. But he doesn't need to worry because he's about to introduce his own form of groovy dancing – the Jump-Jump-Jumping Jive! Full review...

The White Book by Silvia Borando, Elisabetta Pica and Lorenzo Clerici

5star.jpg For Sharing

A little boy stands in front of a white wall, paint brush in hand. He looks concerned where he should start. We turn the page and he smiles because he now has a column of pink paint down the side of the page. We turn the page and his smile widens as his paint expands across the page to reveal the white outline of a bird. There are six birds on the next page and he is smiling broadly. But, when we turn the page again, his smile has gone – the birds have left the pink wall and are flying off across the page. And so the story continues with a new colour and a new animal on the next page of this unique wordless picture book. Full review...

Baby Touch: Busy Baby

4.5star.jpg

Children grow up fast enough without encouraging your baby to drive a car, but this has not stopped ‘‘Busy Baby’’ as he is behind the wheel of a roadster that has a lovely feel to it. Try and keep up with Baby as he takes you on a trip across the rolling hills to a land full of animals of all textures. Baby Racers and lions? Sounds like a recipe for disaster to me, thankfully this is all part of a ‘‘Baby Touch’’ range of books. Full review...

Take a Square by Britta Teckentrup

4star.jpg For Sharing

Sometimes it is hard to determine who is enjoying reading a sharing book the most; the adult or the child. A book can look great, or have an interesting art style that draws the mature reader in, but does the baby care? Unless it is colourful with plenty going on, toddlers are not really bothered that their mum or dad are getting a fun nostalgia blast from the book. If you are going to design a book for youngsters, first make sure that it appeals to them and then think about the parent later. Full review...

Elmer by David McKee

5star.jpg For Sharing

Everyone knows the story of Elmer , the elephant who is ‘’not’’ elephant colour, and this board book allows him to be introduced to an even younger audience. Full review...

Best Friends by Kim Hyun

3.5star.jpg For Sharing

Teaching your young child new words is one of the wonders of parenthood, but once you have grown tired of teaching them mildly rude words, what is next? Thankfully, like with most thing in modern living, there is a book to help you that is full of popular and useful phrases to use in everyday situations. I mean who else is going to teach you to say Pardon Me, if you have an accident? Full review...