Newest For Sharing Reviews

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Augustus and His Smile by Catherine Rayner

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Trying to find a tiger's smile is no easy feat. The chances are that it will be on the end of their face and this is a face full off teeth, attached to a powerful cat with claws. Personally, I would leave finding a tiger's smile to someone far more trained that I, or the animal themselves. Thankfully, Augustus is a practical chap and he sets out to discover what exactly did happen to his smile. Full review...

Lottie Potter Wants an Otter by Jeanne Willis and Leonie Lord

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Purchasing a new pet is a complex enough business without trying to use alliteration, so reading a book about pet purchases and tongue twisters can get tricky. The adult can end up tripping over their own words when reading out loud to their child. The kid may find this funny, but does it make for a pleasurable read? Full review...

Convertible Submarine by Claire Phillip

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They told me life would be easy reviewing books; grab it, read it, review it. What they did not say that I would have to do is also play with it, build it and sit in it! There is a thin line between an interactive book and a toy. When this thin line involves a book that you can convert into a play mat and also a submarine, it is hard to understand what it is at all. Welcome to the world of the Convertible Submarine. Full review...

Life is Magic by Meg McLaren

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It is not often that you pick up a book and feel the warmth and magic come of it. It is extremely rare in adult fiction, but in children's books you find it more often if you only look. Great illustrations and wonderful stories can combine to make a book that will entrance both a youngster and adult as they read together. When you find one of these books you should treasure it as it is something that may be read to your grandchildren in the future. Full review...

Gorilla Loves Vanilla by Chae Strathie and Nicola O'Byrne

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One day, I imagine it's probably a sunny Saturday, all the animals are heading to Sam's Sundaes for special treats. A bit like the wonder that is Marble Slab (google it), Sam can create any flavour you desire. Blue cheese flavour for Mouse? Easy. Worm flavour for Chicken? Ick…but not problem. Mud flavour for Hippo, fish finger flavour for Cat, time and again Sam gets it right. But then Gorilla arrives and all the animals strain to hear what this big beast will request… Full review...

Super Stan by Matt Robertson

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Stan is no ordinary little brother, oh no, because Stan can run faster and throw further and jump higher than his big brother Jack. Stan can also fly, of course! Poor Jack finds that even when he is helpful and kind, his little superhero brother can go one better, so when Jack finds someone's wallet on the floor and returns it, Stan captures a burglar in his car & carries the car to the police! So when it is Jack's birthday he is hopeful that perhaps for just one day, he will be the special one in the family, and Stan won't do anything to spoil his fun. Full review...

Bossy Jonathan Fossy (The Ever So Series) by Julie Fulton and Elina Ellis

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Jonathan Fossy was ever so bossy, demanding that his Mum bring him chocolate and gum and then paint his bedroom bright blue. He made demands of everyone, including the neighbours (a ten feet wide boat with a cabin for him) and you might wonder why anyone put up with it. (I had in mind a sharp slap across the back of a couple of bare legs, but that's probably illegal, albeit effective, these days.) Finally PC Moran hatched a dastardly plan: I'm not going to tell you what it was, but suffice it to say that he got his comeuppance in a most effective way and was a decidedly more pleasant young man thereafter. Full review...

Lucinda Belinda Melinda McCool by Jeanne Willis and Tony Ross

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Lucinda Belinda is extremely beautiful and she feels it's her duty to bring beauty to the world. And if this means telling others to sort out their eyebrows, lose their big behinds, file their nails or just up their grooming generally then so be it. Full review...

Goodnight Spaceman by Michelle Robinson

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'Goodnight Spaceman' is a warm and tender look at space exploration told through the eyes of two young boys who have an astronaut for a Dad. On the upside, this seems to mean that you get to keep moon rock in your bedroom. On the downside, space is too far to reach out for a hug. So, the boys blast off to see Dad's workplace before bed time. Not only is this topical when the International Space Station currently orbits with a British astronaut on board, there is an introductory letter from the great man himself, Tim Peake. Sounds like a winning formula when for so many tots space is the favourite frontier. I was eager to read this with my three year old. Full review...

There's a Tiger in the Garden by Lizzy Stewart

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Though it's said that you should never judge a book by a cover, the front of 'There's a Tiger in the Garden' gives cause to linger. Here is a taste of the splendid illustrations to come – verdant foliage, bright dragonflies, and, of course, a bright orange tiger. Should you not be convinced to pick it up by the visuals alone, the gorgeous embossing adds a further dimension. Lovely pop-out richness you can feel. What a great start. Full review...

Horton and the Kwuggerbug and More Lost Stories by Dr Seuss

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Going back and revisiting characters once an author has died is not always the best idea, too often the result smacks of a cash in that does not have any of the charm of the original. However, revisiting lesser works by the author is a different thing. If a fan has all the writer's books, but never managed to get their hands on their obscure short stories or tales written for magazines, a new collection may just work. Even for as eccentric an author as Dr Seuss. Full review...

Supertato Veggies Assemble by Sue Hendra and Paul Linnet

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In the fight of good versus evil many superheroes stand out. Batman. Spiderman. And now, straight from the aisles of the supermarket, we have Supertato. He's a cape wearing, belt toting spud. Variety unknown. What I do know is that he's a huge hit in my toddler's nursery class and he's back for another battle against his arch enemy the evil pea. Full review...

This Is Not A Bedtime Story by Will Mabbitt and Fred Blunt

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Anyone who has read the same story over and over again to their child will have felt the crushing feeling of mundanity. It's very tempting to hide that bland, but popular, book and explain to your child that it must be lost. The adult may feel like this, but once a child gets a little older, they too may feel the same. Why not interject a little more action into a tired story and make it anew? Full review...

Goodnight Tiger by Timothy Knapman and Laura Hughes

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It was the middle of the night, but Emily could not sleep for the noise. There was bellowing and stomping and growling and trumpeting. Brave girl that she was, she got out of bed and looked out of the window, thinking that the animals had escaped from the zoo, but the street was empty. Then she checked all the usual hiding places as well as her toy box - and suddenly realised that the noises were coming from the animals in her wallpaper. Emily's not just brave - she's resourceful too and she set about settling the jungle down for the night. And one solution turns out to work just perfectly. Full review...

Elephant's Pyjamas by Michelle Robinson and Emily Fox

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I've read a lot of stories recently about animals who don't have many friends, at least at the beginning of their tale. For this age group it's pretty much a given that by the last page they'll have lots of lovely companions with whom to spend their days. Elephant is not one of those unlucky souls, though. He has TONS of friends and he's just been invited to a party with all of them. Lucky thing. Full review...

Tiger in a Tutu by Fabi Santiago

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Everyone should have the chance to dance, non? Especially in such a wonderful city as Paris, bursting as it is with artists and appreciators of the arts. It is with a sad heart, then, that I must tell you about Max. Every day, he goes to ballet school, and every day he is turned away. Not only is he lacking the requisite attire, but he's a boy, and a tiger. And apparently that is not allowed. Full review...

Claude Going for Gold! by Alex T Smith

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I've been a fan of Claude from the beginning. He charmed me from the start, with his plump tummy, little legs, red jumper and rather fetching beret. I can't help but love a dog who wears a beret! He also has a charming best friend, Sir Bobblysock, (who is indeed a woolly sock) who always makes me laugh. In this particular book they are off on another hunt for an adventure, and although it seems for a while that there is simply no fun to be had outside of the house they finally fall, literally, into a Very Exciting Sports Competition! Full review...

Do You Remember? by Helen Docherty and Mark Beech

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We have various picture books in our house that have a tendency to leave me a little blurry eyed, whilst my children remain entirely nonplussed! Aimed at sparking some parental emotion, the stories behind them are often a little lacking. This book, however, works for both children and grown ups, in a really lovely way. Beginning with a small child's cry of I can't do it! the mum in the story reminisces about all the many different (and funny) things that her child has learned to do over the years, encouraging her that she has always got there in the end. Full review...

What Will Danny Do Today? by Pippa Goodhart and Sam Usher

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Every day we face a multitude of choices, from what to wear and what to eat to what to do when we get home in the evening. This book is all about making decisions, but in a very simple and fun way that encourages discussion with your toddler. The character we are deciding for is a little boy called Danny, and we follow him through the course of one day, thinking about what he will decide on each page. Full review...

The Very Grumpy Day by Stella J Jones and Alison Edgson

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Happiness is contagious, but did you ever consider that grumpiness might be too? If you look at Bear, it's quite plain to see. He's not having a good day, and when he takes it out on Mole, it spreads quickly through the forest, with Hedgehog and Fox and the squirrels and the owls all getting a taste. What a horrible, grumpy day for everyone. Full review...

Does a Kangaroo Have a Mother Too? by Eric Carle

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Babies have mothers, mothers who may well be reading these books with them. And their mothers have mothers, or they used to at any rate. But what about other animals. Does a kangaroo have a mother? How about lions and dolphins? Full review...

Little Red by Bethan Woolvin

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We all know the story of Little Red Riding Hood, yes? Like many fairy tales, it's a little dark, so when you hear of a version that reimagines the story, your mind starts to wonder how they may have done this. Maybe a happy ending? That would be nice. Full review...

The Ugly Duckling by Mara Alperin and Sue Eastland

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There are certain fairy tales that you need to know as a child, not only because they are fun stories themselves, but because they inform other stories too. How are you going to know what is happening in future books when they play off a classic; unless you know the classic? Therefore, before embarking on Meta novels that reimagine old stories, get the basics down pat first. How about the story of an unfortunate duckling who was incredibly ugly? Full review...

Eeyore Loses a Tail (Winnie the Pooh Classics) by A A Milne and E H Shepard

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Eeyore, the Old Grey Donkey stood in the thistly corner of the forest and thought about things. He was quite a philosopher in his own way, but his most profound thought occured when Winnie-the-Pooh came along and enquired as to how he was.

Not very how, he said. I don't seem to have felt at all how for a long time. Full review...

The Adventures of Beekle: The Unimaginary Friend by Dan Santat

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A child's imagination can be a powerful tool, so their imaginary friend could be absolutely anything. How about a giant panda or an octopus that likes to build sandcastles? But what of those forgotten creatures; if an imaginary friend sits in the dark and no one thinks about them, do they exist? An audacious animal may just buck up the courage to stop waiting around for someone to imagine them and instead seek out their friend. Full review...

We're in the Wrong Book! by Richard Byrne

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Rarely do you read a book written for adults that breaks the fourth wall, but not a month goes past that I don't stumble across a children's book that has characters talking to the reader, or jumping from book to book. Done well, the idea of leaping from genre to genre within the refines of the same text is a great way of introducing youngsters to different types of reading material. Done averagely and it feels more like an author ticking off that pesky fourth wall breaking book for their resume. Full review...

Cat's Colours by Airlie Anderson

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Great Britain can feel like a grey country sometimes, especially on a cold winter's day when the fog is thick in the air. You can barely see your own hand in front of you, never mind the fertile landscape. Bringing a little colour into a grey world is like bringing a little joy in, so perhaps you can find a little happiness following Cat as she looks for some colour? You may even discover a wonderful surprise at the end of the adventure. Full review...

The Lion Inside by Rachel Bright and Jim Field

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Books about scary beasts that turn out to be not so scary are immensely popular, and I blame Disney for how much of a hit this one is sure to be. The reason is sitting quietly on top of a rock on page five. Why, hello Mr Lion. Full review...

Peekaboo 1 2 3 by Gareth Lucas

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We're waiting for the start of the Animal Antics race and everyone (well nearly everyone, but more of that later) is wondering who is going to win. At the moment is looks as though the lineup is a crab and two mice, but more - lots more - entrants are hidden behind the flaps. Lift the first flap and there's 'One polar bear on a pogo stick'. Under the second we have 'two turkeys on a tandem'. At number three there are 'three gorillas in a gondola'. You're probably getting the idea by now! The crab and the mice are still running, but they're not going to have a chance as we move through the numbers individually up to twenty and then in tens up to fifty, and then a giant leap to a hundred - with the way the entrants are travelling getting more and more outrageous by the minute. Full review...

Where's the Starfish? by Barroux

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There's a whale. A large whale. And there's a lot of fish. A lot of fish. They're there in every shape and size you can imagine and in amongst them are the Starfish, the Jellyfish and the Clownfish. On the first page it's actually quite difficult to find those three in amongst all the others, but if you persist you will find them. It will still be quite difficult on the following page, but there's a little something creeping in that's not quite so pleasant. There's an empty plastic bottle and an old tin can. Actually, the fish are quite interested. It's a little easier to spot our three fish on the next page, because there isn't quite so much space. The rubbish has grown, you see. Full review...

Tidy by Emily Gravett

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Pete the badger likes tidy. He does it very well. Well, perhaps it's a little bit too well. He's not content with checking all the flowers in the woodland and removing any which didn't quite match, he insists on brushing fox to remove all the brambles and burrs. I'm not certain that using a hedgehog to do this is really a good idea, but Pete seems to find it effective. All the birds have to be bathed, and their beaks clean and even the rocks are scoured and scrubbed. Leaves are a major problem: just think about all that sweeping up and all the bin bags of leaves which have to be stored. There is an obvious solution. Full review...

Pass It On by Sophy Henn

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A small girl wakes up one morning, yawns in the morning sun and then bounces through the day finding joy in everyday situations and encouraging those around her to enjoy them too. Even on gloomy grey days she has the happy knack of finding something to smile about. This is most definitely a glass half full little person. By the end of book the reader probably will be too! Full review...