Newest For Sharing Reviews

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The Mood Hoover by Paul Brown and Rowena Blyth

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No one could ever have confused Stan with a sunbeam. He was mischievous (well, personally, I'd have said 'unpleasant') and he had a secret: an invention, in fact. He'd created a machine which could suck up anything which was happy or fun and it was called 'the mood hoover'. His sister's bedroom was the first place he put the machine through its paces and within a matter of moments all the girly niceness had been replaced by dull, grey ordinariness. It didn't just work in confined spaces either: the couple admiring a rainbow were surprised to find the vivid colours turned to dullness. You don't want to know what he got up to in the zoo... Full review...

I Love My Daddy by Jonathan Litton and Fhiona Galloway

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Father's Day is a great time to really pump up your Dad's ego. If he is anything like me he already thinks he is a bit of an Adonis; seeing that paunch in the mirror more as relaxed muscle than the beer gut that it is. To be honest, as a Pop, I am pretty much content with a pint, a book or a football game, but if a child does insist on getting their elder a gift, a nice book about the parent/child relationship may just warm the coldest of cockles. Full review...

Max and Bird by Ed Vere

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Ed Vere has a unique style of artwork for his picture books. The colours are vibrant, the characters are distinctive, the style is a little bit scrappy, in a very charming way. We are big fans in our house so we sat down eagerly to read the latest offering. Here we have Max, a sweet black cat with enormous eyes who meets and befriends a bird. Well, initially his plan is that they play chase and then Max will eat up Bird for a tasty snack but Bird has another idea… Full review...

Colin and Lee, Carrot and Pea by Morag Hood

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Sometimes people don’t quite fit in. Perhaps they are much taller than you, or perhaps they aren’t round enough to roll. Does this mean, then, that if someone is so different you can’t be their friend? When it comes to Colin and Lee, they are about as different as you can get, since one is small and round and green and a pea and the other is, well, a carrot! But does that get in the way of their friendship? Full review...

There's a Bison Bouncing on the Bed by Paul Bright and Chris Chatterton

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Becoming a parent gives you many new insights into life; the pleasure in seeing a child smile or the amazement as they start to utter words. However, the one thing that you really begin to understand is – how much stuff costs. Clothes, food, transport, toys, even furniture. It all costs money and you now have a tiny wrecking ball running around the house seemingly doing their best to destroy them all. It may seem like harmless fun to jump on the bed, but who pays for it when it breaks? The bison? I don't think so. Full review...

Claude All at Sea by Alex T Smith

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Claude is a small dog who likes wearing a beret and a lovely red jumper. He lives with Mr and Mrs Shinyshoes and his best friend is a stripy sock called Sir Bobblysock. Full review...

Amazing Daddy by Rachel Bright

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Daddy Panda and Baby Panda are spending the day together, and Baby Panda is thinking about all the different reasons why his daddy is brilliant. These range from how he smells safe and warm to the extra large breakfasts that daddy makes! There are lots of common, everyday situations, so little ones will enjoy making comparisons with their own lives, and discussing what makes their daddy amazing. Full review...

The Bumblebear by Nadia Shireen

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Ever a sucker for a book about a bear, this one has fast become a favourite for me. Norman is an ordinary kind of bear, small and cuddly and a big fan of honey. He is such a big fan, in fact, that he comes up with a cunning plan in order to make his honey hunting much easier. He decides to dress up as a bee (a giant bee, from Giant Bee Land, obviously) and join Bee School where he has the most marvellous time learning about things like buzzing and finding smelly flowers. However, although most of the bees are convinced of his bee-ness, there is one rather clever little bee who grows increasingly suspicious of poor Norman… Full review...

Augustus and His Smile by Catherine Rayner

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Trying to find a tiger's smile is no easy feat. The chances are that it will be on the end of their face and this is a face full off teeth, attached to a powerful cat with claws. Personally, I would leave finding a tiger's smile to someone far more trained that I, or the animal themselves. Thankfully, Augustus is a practical chap and he sets out to discover what exactly did happen to his smile. Full review...

Lottie Potter Wants an Otter by Jeanne Willis and Leonie Lord

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Purchasing a new pet is a complex enough business without trying to use alliteration, so reading a book about pet purchases and tongue twisters can get tricky. The adult can end up tripping over their own words when reading out loud to their child. The kid may find this funny, but does it make for a pleasurable read? Full review...

Convertible Submarine by Claire Phillip

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They told me life would be easy reviewing books; grab it, read it, review it. What they did not say that I would have to do is also play with it, build it and sit in it! There is a thin line between an interactive book and a toy. When this thin line involves a book that you can convert into a play mat and also a submarine, it is hard to understand what it is at all. Welcome to the world of the Convertible Submarine. Full review...

Life is Magic by Meg McLaren

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It is not often that you pick up a book and feel the warmth and magic come of it. It is extremely rare in adult fiction, but in children's books you find it more often if you only look. Great illustrations and wonderful stories can combine to make a book that will entrance both a youngster and adult as they read together. When you find one of these books you should treasure it as it is something that may be read to your grandchildren in the future. Full review...

Gorilla Loves Vanilla by Chae Strathie and Nicola O'Byrne

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One day, I imagine it's probably a sunny Saturday, all the animals are heading to Sam's Sundaes for special treats. A bit like the wonder that is Marble Slab (google it), Sam can create any flavour you desire. Blue cheese flavour for Mouse? Easy. Worm flavour for Chicken? Ick…but not problem. Mud flavour for Hippo, fish finger flavour for Cat, time and again Sam gets it right. But then Gorilla arrives and all the animals strain to hear what this big beast will request… Full review...

Super Stan by Matt Robertson

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Stan is no ordinary little brother, oh no, because Stan can run faster and throw further and jump higher than his big brother Jack. Stan can also fly, of course! Poor Jack finds that even when he is helpful and kind, his little superhero brother can go one better, so when Jack finds someone's wallet on the floor and returns it, Stan captures a burglar in his car & carries the car to the police! So when it is Jack's birthday he is hopeful that perhaps for just one day, he will be the special one in the family, and Stan won't do anything to spoil his fun. Full review...

Bossy Jonathan Fossy (The Ever So Series) by Julie Fulton and Elina Ellis

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Jonathan Fossy was ever so bossy, demanding that his Mum bring him chocolate and gum and then paint his bedroom bright blue. He made demands of everyone, including the neighbours (a ten feet wide boat with a cabin for him) and you might wonder why anyone put up with it. (I had in mind a sharp slap across the back of a couple of bare legs, but that's probably illegal, albeit effective, these days.) Finally PC Moran hatched a dastardly plan: I'm not going to tell you what it was, but suffice it to say that he got his comeuppance in a most effective way and was a decidedly more pleasant young man thereafter. Full review...

Lucinda Belinda Melinda McCool by Jeanne Willis and Tony Ross

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Lucinda Belinda is extremely beautiful and she feels it's her duty to bring beauty to the world. And if this means telling others to sort out their eyebrows, lose their big behinds, file their nails or just up their grooming generally then so be it. Full review...

Goodnight Spaceman by Michelle Robinson

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'Goodnight Spaceman' is a warm and tender look at space exploration told through the eyes of two young boys who have an astronaut for a Dad. On the upside, this seems to mean that you get to keep moon rock in your bedroom. On the downside, space is too far to reach out for a hug. So, the boys blast off to see Dad's workplace before bed time. Not only is this topical when the International Space Station currently orbits with a British astronaut on board, there is an introductory letter from the great man himself, Tim Peake. Sounds like a winning formula when for so many tots space is the favourite frontier. I was eager to read this with my three year old. Full review...

There's a Tiger in the Garden by Lizzy Stewart

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Though it's said that you should never judge a book by a cover, the front of 'There's a Tiger in the Garden' gives cause to linger. Here is a taste of the splendid illustrations to come – verdant foliage, bright dragonflies, and, of course, a bright orange tiger. Should you not be convinced to pick it up by the visuals alone, the gorgeous embossing adds a further dimension. Lovely pop-out richness you can feel. What a great start. Full review...

Horton and the Kwuggerbug and More Lost Stories by Dr Seuss

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Going back and revisiting characters once an author has died is not always the best idea, too often the result smacks of a cash in that does not have any of the charm of the original. However, revisiting lesser works by the author is a different thing. If a fan has all the writer's books, but never managed to get their hands on their obscure short stories or tales written for magazines, a new collection may just work. Even for as eccentric an author as Dr Seuss. Full review...

Supertato Veggies Assemble by Sue Hendra and Paul Linnet

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In the fight of good versus evil many superheroes stand out. Batman. Spiderman. And now, straight from the aisles of the supermarket, we have Supertato. He's a cape wearing, belt toting spud. Variety unknown. What I do know is that he's a huge hit in my toddler's nursery class and he's back for another battle against his arch enemy the evil pea. Full review...

This Is Not A Bedtime Story by Will Mabbitt and Fred Blunt

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Anyone who has read the same story over and over again to their child will have felt the crushing feeling of mundanity. It's very tempting to hide that bland, but popular, book and explain to your child that it must be lost. The adult may feel like this, but once a child gets a little older, they too may feel the same. Why not interject a little more action into a tired story and make it anew? Full review...

Goodnight Tiger by Timothy Knapman and Laura Hughes

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It was the middle of the night, but Emily could not sleep for the noise. There was bellowing and stomping and growling and trumpeting. Brave girl that she was, she got out of bed and looked out of the window, thinking that the animals had escaped from the zoo, but the street was empty. Then she checked all the usual hiding places as well as her toy box - and suddenly realised that the noises were coming from the animals in her wallpaper. Emily's not just brave - she's resourceful too and she set about settling the jungle down for the night. And one solution turns out to work just perfectly. Full review...

Elephant's Pyjamas by Michelle Robinson and Emily Fox

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I've read a lot of stories recently about animals who don't have many friends, at least at the beginning of their tale. For this age group it's pretty much a given that by the last page they'll have lots of lovely companions with whom to spend their days. Elephant is not one of those unlucky souls, though. He has TONS of friends and he's just been invited to a party with all of them. Lucky thing. Full review...

Tiger in a Tutu by Fabi Santiago

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Everyone should have the chance to dance, non? Especially in such a wonderful city as Paris, bursting as it is with artists and appreciators of the arts. It is with a sad heart, then, that I must tell you about Max. Every day, he goes to ballet school, and every day he is turned away. Not only is he lacking the requisite attire, but he's a boy, and a tiger. And apparently that is not allowed. Full review...

Claude Going for Gold! by Alex T Smith

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I've been a fan of Claude from the beginning. He charmed me from the start, with his plump tummy, little legs, red jumper and rather fetching beret. I can't help but love a dog who wears a beret! He also has a charming best friend, Sir Bobblysock, (who is indeed a woolly sock) who always makes me laugh. In this particular book they are off on another hunt for an adventure, and although it seems for a while that there is simply no fun to be had outside of the house they finally fall, literally, into a Very Exciting Sports Competition! Full review...

Do You Remember? by Helen Docherty and Mark Beech

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We have various picture books in our house that have a tendency to leave me a little blurry eyed, whilst my children remain entirely nonplussed! Aimed at sparking some parental emotion, the stories behind them are often a little lacking. This book, however, works for both children and grown ups, in a really lovely way. Beginning with a small child's cry of I can't do it! the mum in the story reminisces about all the many different (and funny) things that her child has learned to do over the years, encouraging her that she has always got there in the end. Full review...

What Will Danny Do Today? by Pippa Goodhart and Sam Usher

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Every day we face a multitude of choices, from what to wear and what to eat to what to do when we get home in the evening. This book is all about making decisions, but in a very simple and fun way that encourages discussion with your toddler. The character we are deciding for is a little boy called Danny, and we follow him through the course of one day, thinking about what he will decide on each page. Full review...

The Very Grumpy Day by Stella J Jones and Alison Edgson

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Happiness is contagious, but did you ever consider that grumpiness might be too? If you look at Bear, it's quite plain to see. He's not having a good day, and when he takes it out on Mole, it spreads quickly through the forest, with Hedgehog and Fox and the squirrels and the owls all getting a taste. What a horrible, grumpy day for everyone. Full review...

Does a Kangaroo Have a Mother Too? by Eric Carle

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Babies have mothers, mothers who may well be reading these books with them. And their mothers have mothers, or they used to at any rate. But what about other animals. Does a kangaroo have a mother? How about lions and dolphins? Full review...

Little Red by Bethan Woolvin

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We all know the story of Little Red Riding Hood, yes? Like many fairy tales, it's a little dark, so when you hear of a version that reimagines the story, your mind starts to wonder how they may have done this. Maybe a happy ending? That would be nice. Full review...

The Ugly Duckling by Mara Alperin and Sue Eastland

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There are certain fairy tales that you need to know as a child, not only because they are fun stories themselves, but because they inform other stories too. How are you going to know what is happening in future books when they play off a classic; unless you know the classic? Therefore, before embarking on Meta novels that reimagine old stories, get the basics down pat first. How about the story of an unfortunate duckling who was incredibly ugly? Full review...

Eeyore Loses a Tail (Winnie the Pooh Classics) by A A Milne and E H Shepard

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Eeyore, the Old Grey Donkey stood in the thistly corner of the forest and thought about things. He was quite a philosopher in his own way, but his most profound thought occured when Winnie-the-Pooh came along and enquired as to how he was.

Not very how, he said. I don't seem to have felt at all how for a long time. Full review...