We Need to Talk About Money by Otegha Uwagba

From TheBookbag
Revision as of 11:17, 29 June 2021 by Sue (talk | contribs) (Created page with "{{infobox1 |title=We Need to Talk About Money |author=Otegha Uwagba |reviewer=Sue Magee |genre=Politics and Society |summary=An eye-opening look at the position of young women...")
(diff) ← Older revision | Latest revision (diff) | Newer revision → (diff)
Jump to navigationJump to search


We Need to Talk About Money by Otegha Uwagba

0008350388.jpg
Buy We Need to Talk About Money by Otegha Uwagba at Amazon.co.uk or Amazon.com

Category: Politics and Society
Rating: 5/5
Reviewer: Sue Magee
Reviewed by Sue Magee
Summary: An eye-opening look at the position of young women - and particularly young Black women in society. It's brilliantly readable and frightening when you realise what we, as a society, are losing. A book everyone should read.
Buy? Yes Borrow? Yes
Pages: 304 Date: July 2021
Publisher: Fourth Estate
External links: Author's website
ISBN: 978-0008350383

Share on: Facebook Follow us on Twitter Follow us on Instagram



To be a dark-skinned Black woman is to be seen as less desirable, less hireable, less intelligent and ultimately less valuable than my light-skinned counterparts... We Need to Talk About Money by Otegha Uwagba

0.7% of English Literature GCSE students in England study a book by a writer of colour while only 7% study a book by a woman. The Bookseller 29 June 2021

Otegha Uwagba came to the UK from Kenya when she was five years old. Her sisters were seven and nine. It was her mother who came first, with her father joining them later. The family was hard-working, principled and determined that their children would have the best education possible. There was always a painful awareness of money although this did not translate into a shortage of anything: it was simply carefully harvested. When Otegha was ten the family acquired a car. For Otegha, education meant a scholarship to a private school in London and then a place at New College, Oxford.

In 2020, only 3% of students admitted to Oxford were Black and casual misogyny and sexism were endemic. On graduation, Uwagba would discover ever wider divides. The children of the rich were able to take on six-month unpaid internships: those without such financial backing had to find employment. She would find similar divides when she came to look for a flat to buy: years of scrimping and saving seemed to lead to more and more disappointment: those who could rely on 'the bank of mum and dad' otherwise known as family money were buying properties outright without a mortgage - and then moving on to their second million pound plus property.

The greatest divide is not apparently between white and Black people but between those described as 'paper bag blacks' and darker Black people. Do you remember those brown paper bags which you used to get in grocery stores? Well if you're skin colour is as light as - or lighten then - one of those brown paper bags then you probably won't be discriminated against. If your skin is darker, then you almost certainly will encounter casual but regular discrimination.

Uwagba is occasionally infuriated by the treatment which she and other black people receive - and who wouldn't be - but the book is not a pity party. It's a measured statement of the situation, ably supported by endnotes and logical reasoning. In many ways, this makes it all the more frightening: this isn't a rant that you can dismiss as being 'unbalanced'. It's a measured statement of exactly what we as a society are losing when we fail to help young Black women to flourish. It's a warning of the trouble which we are storing up for ourselves, culturally, socially and financially.

It is a brilliant read: Uwagba has the ability to establish a situation in very few words. She doesn't lecture us but allows us to draw our own conclusions. It's probably one of the most frightening books I've read this year and certainly one of the best. I'd like to thank the publishers for allowing Bookbag to have a review copy.

You might also appreciate:

Why I'm No Longer Talking to White People About Race by Reni Eddo-Lodge
The Double X Economy by Linda Scott
Women of the Revolution: Forty Years of Feminism by Kira Cochrane (editor)
Can I Speak to Someone in Charge? by Emily Clarkson
Everywoman: One Woman's Truth About Speaking the Truth by Jess Phillips

Please share on: Facebook Facebook, Follow us on Twitter Twitter and Follow us on Instagram Instagram

Buy We Need to Talk About Money by Otegha Uwagba at Amazon You can read more book reviews or buy We Need to Talk About Money by Otegha Uwagba at Amazon.co.uk Amazon currently charges £2.99 for standard delivery for orders under £20, over which delivery is free.

Buy We Need to Talk About Money by Otegha Uwagba at Amazon You could get a free audio download of We Need to Talk About Money by Otegha Uwagba with a 30-day Audible free trial at Amazon.co.uk.

Buy We Need to Talk About Money by Otegha Uwagba at Amazon You can read more book reviews or buy We Need to Talk About Money by Otegha Uwagba at Amazon.com.

We Need to Talk About Money by Otegha Uwagba Check prices, read reviews or buy from Foyles. Foyles currently charges £2.99 (first class £3.99) for orders under £25, over which delivery is free. You may also click and collect from a Foyles bookshop at no charge.

We Need to Talk About Money by Otegha Uwagba Check prices, read reviews or buy from Waterstones. Waterstones currently charges from £2.75 for orders under £20, over which delivery is free. You may also click and collect from a Waterstones bookshop at no charge.

Comments

Like to comment on this review?

Just send us an email and we'll put the best up on the site.