Time: The Immortal Divide (The Chronicles of Fate and Choice) by K S Turner

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Time: The Immortal Divide (The Chronicles of Fate and Choice) by K S Turner

Category: Fantasy
Rating: 4/5
Reviewer: Ani Johnson
Reviewed by Ani Johnson
Summary: The final part of The Chronicles of Fate and Choice closes a fantasy trilogy that's dared to be different and, on the whole, succeeds well.
Buy? Yes Borrow? Yes
Pages: 576 Date: October 2016
Publisher: Ruby Blaze Publishing
External links: Author's website
ISBN: 978-0956224293

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As we open this, the third book of the trilogy, Tachra is on the threshold of either victory or death. As Arrunn runs amok, Tachra's kutu allies disappear on paths that are separated from hers so she's forced to rely on her own wit and power. As Tachra and her people teeter on the edge of destruction, will that be enough?

British author K S Turner (Kate to her friends) began her Chronicles of Fate and Choice with a desire to push the fantasy/sci-fi envelope. The first part, Before the Gods, was lauded as a triumph. The second Tumultus, seemed to suffer from middle book syndrome and now we have the third. I enjoyed it although others may feel that Kate's bravery has a marmite edge to it.

This third book is Tachra's show, especially as the shaa-kutu – the good guys – can't get through to help her with any sustained ease. Her problems are two-fold, i.e. evil chief Nigh-kutu Arrunn and his legacy which I don't want to spoil. Let's just say that this legacy brings moments of great joy while being the catalysts for moments of great sadness. (Yes, there were tears!)

I love the fact that Tachra's world and corresponding nether world landscapes are often left to our imaginations to fill in. This doesn't denote any disability with words on Kate's part. She chops and changes narrative styles, increasing the feeling that this isn't your average fantasy/sci-fi.

Throughout the series, Tachra is the only character permitted to go past the fourth wall and address us in a direct first person. This doesn't just differentiate Tachra's chapters from the third person of the kutu, it defines her as our guide and focal point. She definitely deserves the attention, being naturally engaging and one of the most memorable characters I've read in a while.

Then between the first and third person narratives there's something that my fellow Bookbag reviewer, Amit Vyas, referred to as being like journalistic reportage. I agreed with him totally and then realised I'd read this style somewhere before: in the Bible. (Don't worry – bear with me, I promise not to open any can of worms on how truthful, if at all, the Bible is.)

I won't reproduce it here as it's a fair chunk of wordage, but the paragraph at the top of page 231 is a prime example. Reported speech, sometimes clipped sentences, sometimes longer that fulfils a similar purpose in this book as it did in ancient scriptures. That is, The Chronicles of Fate and Choice is also a document bearing witness to momentous events for future generations. With this interpretation it makes more sense why some events are told rather than shown and this is where some of the marmite will be found.

Whether we enjoy the series or not depends on whether we can accept and be swept along by the cosmopolitan philosophy that interjects the action, the sometimes story telling rather than witnessing for ourselves and the idea that first party narratives rarely fill in any other character but their own. (It's often in the nature of the genre.) If we can, then Kate rewards us with an originality that, for me, works and leaves me anticipating what she'll set before us next.

(A big thank you to the folks at Ruby Blaze for providing us with a copy for review.)

Further Reading: If you enjoy sci-fi/fantasy that is indeed a little bit different and thought provoking, we recommend The Arrival of Missives by Aliya Whiteley and/or All Their Minds In Tandem by David Sanger. If you prefer more straight forward god-tinged fantasy, then The Godless by Ben Peek is an excellent next read.

Buy Time: The Immortal Divide (The Chronicles of Fate and Choice) by K S Turner at Amazon You can read more book reviews or buy Time: The Immortal Divide (The Chronicles of Fate and Choice) by K S Turner at Amazon.co.uk.


Buy Time: The Immortal Divide (The Chronicles of Fate and Choice) by K S Turner at Amazon You can read more book reviews or buy Time: The Immortal Divide (The Chronicles of Fate and Choice) by K S Turner at Amazon.com.


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