Thoroughly Modern People: The Long Way Home by Chima Njoku-Latty

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Thoroughly Modern People: The Long Way Home by Chima Njoku-Latty

Category: Women's Fiction
Rating: 2.5/5
Reviewer: Louise Laurie
Reviewed by Louise Laurie
Summary: A below-average read (in my opinion) about love in all its guises. Ditzy central character Arabella tries to be grown-up about life and love but she usually falls back on being child-like, attention-seeking and very annoying.
Buy? Maybe Borrow? Maybe
Pages: 384 Date: November 2010
Publisher: My Destiny Ltd
ISBN: 978-0956600103

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The front cover graphics are good: interesting and refreshingly modern and when I opened the book I liked the easy-on-the-eye print format. And I think that's where my positive comments end. The back cover blurb says that this book is A beautifully moving story. I found it neither beautiful nor moving, I'm afraid.

As early as page 4 I was getting the gist of Njoku-Latty's style. Long-winded. We meet Arabella, the main character, as she grimaces, hisses, gasps and groans through a typical day in her life. For example, Oh the gasps of horror and disappointment that would echo ... and Oh what joy, she purred ... I'm feeling a bit queasy even typing these sentences they are so amateurish in their content and style. And I'm doing my level best to become interested in Arabella but the author makes it very hard indeed. She throws in so many unnecessary details all over the place which ramble on and on and do nothing for the plot - such as it is. Then there's the sugary choice of words to contend with. They are all over this book like a nasty rash - Clutching it to her breast, she began to sob again. This style does not endear itself to me in any shape or form. I simply want to stop reading.

Arabella is leaving behind her old life in London to start a new one in America with her latest lover, Max (old enough to be her father apparently) and she simply can't wait. Max is definitely the one she wants to spend the rest of her life with, have children with. But as a mature man of 64 he comes with a fair amount of baggage: a wife he still has affection and respect for, grown-up children and even a couple of grandchildren. But Arabella's not phased. Everything will be just perfect. Won't it?

And even if the narrative did interest me, there's way too many names and characters to grapple with. It could be confusing for the reader, to say the least. It gets worse. I haven't hit page 20 and I'm groaning with frustration. There's a piece about Arabella ordering a taxi to take her to the airport for her US flight and it's so drawn-out and long-winded that it's easy to lose the plot. And some of the dialogue I can only describe as dreadful, sorry to be so blunt.

By page 35 I'd most definitely reached my tolerance level and would have chosen to stuff the book behind the nearest cushion. But I didn't, of course. I took a deep breath, a strong coffee and ploughed on ...

Now here's a funny thing. There was a line or two that did grab my attention early on. Njoku-Latty obviously was pleased with it too. She repeats it three, if not four times, later on in the book. Word for word. Even when some of the characters are in the middle of some heated debate (or as heated as it gets) it's all made somewhat ludicrous by the author insisting on adding details about the soft furnishings or what one of the characters just happened to be wearing. I despaired. This is a good example - of a poor book.

I'd like to thank the publishers for sending a copy to the Bookbag.

If this type of book appeals then you might like to try Hippy Chick by Louise Harwood.

Buy Thoroughly Modern People: The Long Way Home by Chima Njoku-Latty at Amazon You can read more book reviews or buy Thoroughly Modern People: The Long Way Home by Chima Njoku-Latty at Amazon.co.uk.


Buy Thoroughly Modern People: The Long Way Home by Chima Njoku-Latty at Amazon You can read more book reviews or buy Thoroughly Modern People: The Long Way Home by Chima Njoku-Latty at Amazon.com.


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