Heroes Volume One by Chuck Kim and others

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Heroes Volume One by Chuck Kim and others

Category: Graphic Novels
Rating: 4/5
Reviewer: Loralei Haylock
Reviewed by Loralei Haylock
Summary: Heroes Volume One is enjoyable but will never carry any real weight, as it is a supplement to the show, rather than a necessary companion. Buy if you're a fan but otherwise avoid.
Buy? Maybe Borrow? Maybe
Pages: 240 Date: November 2007
Publisher: Titan Books Ltd
External links: Author's website
ISBN: 978-1845767068

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Heroes Volume One contains the first 34 instalments of the continuing online graphic novel that features on the official NBC Heroes website. Despite the apparent mismatch of numbers (34 instalments to 23 episodes) this Volume is intended as a companion to the first series of Heroes, recently aired on BBC2. Anyone who was not a fan of the series, or did not watch it, should turn away now, as this book is completely meaningless without some background knowledge of the show and its characters.

Each of the 34 instalments is five or six pages long, usually featuring one of the ‘heroes' from the show. As their length implies, these stories are really just snapshots of events. Any major plot points would have to be explored on screen, so the instalments deal more in wrapping up minor plot holes and exploring the more inconsequential pasts of certain characters.

While all this can be interesting, the novel will never carry any real weight, as it is a supplement to the show, rather than a necessary companion. There is never any real drama, as you know nothing is going to happen to the main players. That said, if you want a bit of light entertainment, and have a burning desire to know the exact details of how DL escaped from jail or how Isaac first discovered his ability to paint the future, this book will be more than satisfactory.

The Volume starts with a series of individual instalments of no great consequence. It hits its stride with the multipart story arcs Wireless and War Buddies. Wireless explores the history of the mysterious Hana Gitelman, who appeared briefly on the show to point Matt and Ted in the right direction, while War Buddies delves into the shared history of Linderman and the Petrelli family. Not being so closely tied to the plotlines of the show makes these instalments feel more complete and substantial.

The artwork throughout is gorgeous – though they do seem to have trouble capturing Claire, on the front cover she looks more like Sophia Myles than Hayden Panettiere – and fans of the Tim Sale artwork featured on the show will be pleased to hear each of the 34 instalments is prefaced by one of his pictures.

Some may find the £17.99 cover price a little steep, particularly as the majority of the content is available free, and legally, online. The book far surpasses the online versions in terms of tactile and aesthetic pleasure, but the only real extras you get are an introduction by Masi Oka (Hiro) and an interview with series writers Aron Eli Coleite and Joe Pokaski.

Overall, Heroes Volume One is enjoyable, despite its limitations. As long as you don't anticipate the same level of story quality set by the show, Volume One will not be a disappointment. However, this is really only a 'must have' for the more diehard Heroes fans out there. It is an unnecessary, but not unwelcome addition to the Heroes universe.

Buy Heroes Volume One by Chuck Kim and others at Amazon You can read more book reviews or buy Heroes Volume One by Chuck Kim and others at Amazon.co.uk.


Buy Heroes Volume One by Chuck Kim and others at Amazon You can read more book reviews or buy Heroes Volume One by Chuck Kim and others at Amazon.com.


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