A Journey Through the Weather by John Haslam and Steve Parker

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A Journey Through the Weather by John Haslam and Steve Parker

Category: Children's Non-Fiction
Rating: 4.5/5
Reviewer: Zoe Morris
Reviewed by Zoe Morris
Summary: An interesting and detailed look at the weather, this goes deeper than just basic descriptions, to good effect
Buy? Yes Borrow? Yes
Pages: 48 Date: April 2016
Publisher: QED Publishing
External links: Author's website
ISBN: 978-1784934507

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We're British. We LOVE to talk about the weather. But beyond the usual platitudes of Bit cold out isn't it or What a beautiful day, how much do you actually know about what's happening up in the sky? I can describe the weather in half a dozen languages – it's a staple of any language course – but it's purely superficial: it's sunny, it's cold, yesterday it was windy, good grief tomorrow it's going to snow.

This book, as you can probably tell from my lead in, goes further than that. It is an in-depth look at weather patterns and seasons, and it was surprisingly interesting. This isn't a story book about the weather. There's no plot, no characters experiencing the changing temperatures for example. Instead, it's a factual look at how things work, and it goes into a fair bit of detail. For example, we learn the names for different types of clouds like Cirrus and Altocumulus. We learn how hailstones are formed, and what has to come together for a hurricane to hit. There's a section on droughts and one on floods (though sadly without a picture of a famous French art gallery being evacuated).

There's quite a lot of text on the pages as it's an educational and informative book, probably best appreciated by the junior school age group once reading fluency has improved and scientific concepts are starting to take hold. It would be a good one for wider reading as part of a school project as there's tons of detail.

Because this is a children's book, it needs pictures to take it from dreary to accessible reference, and these are in abundance with lots of international scenes showing everything from the Equator to the Arctic. There's nice detail too – snowboarders as well as skiers descend the mountains when we're talking about snow fall.

The book jacket unfolds into a poster. It's the sort of thing you might find on a classroom wall, and is a bit superfluous for a book to have at home, but it's a harmless if slightly oddly thought out addition.

This book would be a good addition to any family's non-fiction stash. It's incredibly informative but it's fun to read too – the sort you could pick up at any time, not just when a weather themed report is due. Parents and children alike will learn from this one. I'd like to thank the publishers for sending us a copy to review.

For more on this topic, check out 50 Things You Should Know About: Wild Weather by Anna Claybourne

Buy A Journey Through the Weather by John Haslam and Steve Parker at Amazon You can read more book reviews or buy A Journey Through the Weather by John Haslam and Steve Parker at Amazon.co.uk.


Buy A Journey Through the Weather by John Haslam and Steve Parker at Amazon You can read more book reviews or buy A Journey Through the Weather by John Haslam and Steve Parker at Amazon.com.


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